In order that people may be happy


In 1851 John Ruskin* said:

In order that people may be happy at work, these three things are needed:
They must be fit for it, they must not do too much of it, and they must have a sense of success in it.

*John Ruskin (8 February 1819 – 20 January 1900) was the leading English art critic of the Victorian era, as well as an art patron, draughtsman, watercolourist, a prominent social thinker and philanthropist.

Does it help?

Posted by on Jul 1, 2018 in Abso-effing-lutely | No Comments

Okay, you know how you feel, what you need, what you want…

This next thing you’re going to do or say: Does it help you get closer to that?

~ Seth Godin

Remember when frontend was fun?

Posted by on May 22, 2018 in Abso-effing-lutely, Ipso Fabulous | No Comments

Go here. So many LOLZ! Thank you so much Sara Vieira for making this real!

Media out of balance

Via Seth Godin:

Successful media (let’s define ‘successful’ as media that can make a difference, make a connection and possibly make a living) has four elements:

Attention

Enrollment

Trust and

Permission

Too often, particularly online, people just worry about the first one.

It’s a race to go viral, to go low, to make a bunch of noise. The quick hit, the shortcut, the inflammation.

But attention is insufficient.

Enrollment means that your audience wants to go where you’re going.

Trust earns you the benefit of the doubt.

And permission means you don’t have to begin from scratch every time. You’ve earned some attention. The privilege of delivering anticipated, personal and relevant messages over time.

Photo by Rachael Crowe on Unsplash

An actual thing that actually happened

Posted by on Apr 30, 2018 in Abso-effing-lutely, Creatives I admire | No Comments

It is time you discovered the brilliance of Tim Urban and Andrew Finn’s Wait But Why: New Post Every Sometimes. Start with the FAQs on the About page then go directly to this>>

Seth Godin: Ignore sunk clowns

Posted by on Mar 7, 2018 in Abso-effing-lutely, Ipso Fabulous | No Comments

Wise advise by Seth Godin:

Yes there was supposed to be a clown at your birthday party. No, he didn’t show up. That’s a bummer.

But! But your friends are all here, and the sun is shining and you’ve got cake and a game of pin the tail on the donkey ready to go.

The question is: how long should you mourn the loss of the clown? How much more of your party are you ready to sacrifice?

The same question confronts the pro golfer who three-putted on the third hole.

Or the accountant who forgot an obvious deduction, one that can’t be recovered.

Or the salesperson who missed a key meeting, or the speaker who got let down because the tech crew screwed up her first three slides.

When we can see these glitches as clowns, as temporary glitches that are unrelated to the cosmic harmony of the universe or even the next thing that’s going to happen to us, they’re easier to compartmentalize.

That happened.

Okay, now what?

Photo by David Larivière on Unsplash