The crisp meeting

The biggest difference between great work and pretty-good work are the meetings that accompanied it. It’s a disappointing waste of time, resources and talent to spend money to work on a problem that actually should be a conversation first… and then schedule the meetings.

Want more info? Read the full article by the *always a-may-zing* Seth Godin HERE>>

No shortage of trolls

“Good creators don’t talk shit about their fellow creators. They champion the work of those around them. They know how hard this stuff is. They accept that stumbles are part of what we do. And they treat one another with respect—because we all deserve that.”

– Eric Karjaluoto

Looking for more enlightenment about creating and criticism? Watch this>

 

Photo by Jeremy Bishop on Unsplash

Minimalism

“Minimalism is not the lack of something. It is simply the perfect amount of something.”
— Najahyia Chinchilla

 

Photo by Danielle MacInnes on Unsplash

Empowering the creative community

For creatives, the retirement age of 65 is merely a mile marker, not the end, of their life’s ride. Why? “There is an immortality to being creative,” says one. Here Richard Morgan interviews four creatives, ages 67 to 101, discuss why they continue to hone their craft with no end in sight.

Read the inspiring 99u article HERE>

Nickels and dimes are worth less than that


“The real asset you’re building is trust.

And even though it’s tempting to cut a corner here and there to boost profit per interaction, the real cost is huge.

No one will say anything, no one will put up a fuss, until one day, they’re gone. Those extra few dollars you made with some fancy footwork have now cost you tens of thousands of dollars in lost value.

The opposite is clearly true: invest a nickel or a dime every chance you get, and the trust you earn pays for itself a hundred times over.”
~ Seth Godin

Cost reduce or value increase?


Again, Seth Godin is spot on:

Organizations that want to increase their metrics either invest in:

Creating more value for their customers, or

Doing just enough to keep going, but for less effort and money.

During their first decade, the core group at Amazon regularly amazed customers by investing in work that created more value. When you do that, people talk, the word spreads, growth happens.

Inevitably, particularly for public companies, it becomes easier to focus on keeping what you’ve got going, but cheaper. You may have noticed, for example, that their once legendary customer service hardly seems the same, with 6 or 7 interactions required to get an accurate and useful response.

This happens to organizations regardless of size or stature. It’s a form of entropy. Unless you’re vigilant, the apparently easy path of cost reduction will distract you from the important work of value creation.

The key question to ask in the meeting is: Are we increasing value or lowering costs?

Race to the top or race to the bottom, it’s a choice.